Summertime and Seersucker

June 25, 2007

Reader Roby Cogswell suggested I take a look at a new online publication called The Daily Yonder, which begins with this very good premise: “55 million people live in the rural U.S. ­ Maybe you’re one of them, or used to be, or want to be. As mainstream TV and newspapers retreat from small towns, the Daily Yonder is coming on strong.”

While most of their piece are political, one article on seersucker caught my eye. I once owned a three-piece seersucker–old joke: Sears sold it, and you’re the sucker who bought it–suit that I wore with a straw hat at a Harvard commencement. The only things missing were a cane and a mint julep. Below is a photo of Gregory Peck wearing his seersucker suit in To Kill a Mockingbird.

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This blog is part of a much larger website, also entitled Tennessee Guy, that contains travel and cultural information about Tennessee. Visit it here.


American Bandstand comes to Pigeon Forge

June 25, 2007

Dick Clark’s American Bandstand is the latest attraction attempting to draw a crowd to the ever-changing Pigeon Forge theatrical scene. Based on a similar effort in Branson, Missouri–Pigeon Forge’s twin city–the plan here is to bring in oldie groups such as Herman’s Hermits, Eric Burdon and the Animals, the Doobie Brothers, and Chubby Checker into a 3,900-seat outdoor venue. Ticket prices range from $50 down to $20 plus the considerable Pigeon Forge sales tax.

OK, rock and roll trivia fans, who is this star? Answer after the jump.

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The idle mind wonders what riders these long-faded groups have in their contracts of today. No more “no brown M&Ms” a la Van Halen. From the ages of some of these characters, and the fact that they have been ridden hard and put up wet many times , I’d recommend that the theater have a defibrillator onstage and an ambulance idling out back.

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Bike trails from Tennessee to Georgia?

June 25, 2007

Today’s Knoxville News Sentinel has an article about linking Tennessee bike trails with those in Georgia.

This is an excellent idea. Communities in both states have found that bike trails serve a wide range of ages, provide commuting routes as well as recreational opportunities, and linking these pathways for two-wheelers will be good for tourism. Bike tourists tend to be good visitors: upscale folks who like to end the day with a good meal and who are interested in local culture. As baby boomers age, biking provides a knee-friendly way to get out and have a wonderful trip.

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This blog is part of a much larger website, also entitled Tennessee Guy, that contains travel and cultural information about Tennessee. Visit it here.